Browsing posts tagged with Hitachi Magic Wand
Jun
27

Re-learning orgasm

hitachi-magic-wand-she-bop

Headlines are funny sometimes. “A Trans Woman Learns To Masturbate” is the title the piece was given on Eros Media, yet such a statement ignores the unique, languid writing style of author Jetta Rae. It also simplifies the myriad issues Rae explores — beyond just masturbation, beyond just being trans.

Rae begins by addressing the societal assumptions surrounding masturbation. Masturbation is a safe, healthy time for personal exploration and fantasy — in fact, a time that can be transformative — yet the act is often derided and misrepresented in ways small and large. For instance, the word “masturbatory” is used when someone is acting self-absorbed, relying on the (incorrect) belief that masturbation comes easily for everyone.

The disparagement of masturbation as a simple, mindless game you always win trickles down from the office to the bedroom, and not everyone is able to get off from jerking off. Some of us aren’t able to find “spank material” that treats our sexual and gender identities with respect. Others still are struggling with the idea of being sexual–when we prop up, with our language, this notion of masturbating as foolproof, we risk eclipsing people who could heal the most from self-love in anxiety, fear, and resentment at their own bodies for not being able to “keep up” with those of us able to jokebrag about taking the day off from work to lay in bed and touch ourselves.

After years of hormone replacement therapy, Rae’s cock responded differently to stimulation — it took her longer to become erect, and orgasm began slipping further and further out of reach. Despite happy relationships and sexual forays, the lack of genital response was disheartening. She struggled with anxiety over orgasm.

Having an orgasm in front of another person is a special sort of experience, one that takes us out of our masturbatory comfort zones. Rae wanted it to be easier, and, having seen many partners respond to vibrators, set out to re-train her body to do the same. She bought a Hitachi Magic Wand.

God, I remember those first few nights with my new toy. I swore I could literally taste the electricity in the back of my throat as I tearfully buckled in my bed . . . The ceaseless mechanical quivering sent pulses, both overwhelming and liberating, through my body. I could feel it, not just in my tits, but somehow through my tits, like steam escaping from the sewers to the street.

Yet orgasm remained difficult. Rae often found herself at the edge, overly stimulated, unable to come without experiencing discomfort. What happened next was a happy accident: one night, she gave up her usual routine with the wand and instead rested it at the base of her cock, over her prostate.

It was just the shift in stimulation and thinking that her body and brain needed. Without orgasm as the primary goal, without trying to stick to the same old motions, she was able to relax and get off — in a new way.

All her life, Rae writes, “society had instructed people born with bodies like mine that there is a singular ‘right way’ to masturbate.” Society had also placed a premium on orgasm. Letting go of these assumptions, it turns out, was everything she needed.

Read the whole piece at Eros Media.

May
13

Hitachi Magic Wand, minus the “Hitachi”

It looks like our old friend the Hitachi Magic Wand is getting a bit of a facelift. Notice anything? Yep, the word “Hitachi” is being dropped from its name.

Don’t panic — it’ll always be the powerhouse we’ve always loved. But, as it turns out, Japanese company Hitachi has grown weary of having its name attached to a device far more well-known for its pleasure-inducing properties than its “intended” purpose of massaging sore muscles (although it does that quite well, too!).

Despite the fact that the Magic Wand has been in production for over 30 years, Hitachi planned to cease production of the product. Thankfully, distributor Vibratex stepped in with a better idea: simply remove the word “Hitachi,” and in turn, prevent all-out pandemonium among the masturbating public.

Laura Anne Stuart, owner of the Tool Shed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, attended the International Lingerie Show this year and reported back about the changes. Aside from the re-branding, the toy will have stronger construction and updated componentry, making it even more durable than before. Stuart found the new model to be satisfactory indeed:

I held a new Wand in my hand at the show, and it felt just as powerful to me, with the same intensity of vibration. The minor adjustments that Vibratex made cause the toy to be less jerky when turning on and off and will reduce the extremely small number of defective wands to almost zero. The handle has been reinforced to decrease the vibrations that are transmitted to your hand (rather than to the head of the toy), and the switch circuitry has been improved. In my opinion, you can feel these changes when holding the toy, but not when applying the head of the Wand to a body part.

The Hitachi Magic Wand rose to orgasmic fame in the ’70s, when feminist sex educator Betty Dodson featured it in her book, Liberating Masturbation, and talked it up in her workshops. It’s been a cult classic ever since, much loved for its incredibly powerful vibrations and broad, tennis-ball-sized head. It’s so popular that quite a few attachments have been invented for it, and a sex pillow was even designed specifically to hold one.

An old box for the Hitachi Magic Wand

So sometime in the next few months, our Hitachi Magic Wands will be replaced with updated Magic Wands. And while we’ll miss the box featuring delightful photos of’80s ladies innocently massaging their backs, we’re relieved that Vibratex jumped in and ensured the posterity of the toy that many refer to as “the Cadillac of vibrators.”

Jan
5

“Can I become addicted to my vibrator?”

If you worry that using a vibrator can desensitize you or lessen your enjoyment of other sexual activity, do not fear. Vibrator addiction is a myth, just like many other sexual myths borne of cultural stigma (remember when masturbation was thought to cause blindness?).

Misconceptions about sex toys — like that they can replace partners, for instance — are at the root of the myth that people can become addicted to vibrators. Unfortunately, popular culture isn’t helping. While vibrator usage became more mainstream when Sex and the City featured Charlotte enjoying a rabbit vibrator, the episode simultaneously perpetuated the vibrator addiction myth when her friends had to stage an “intervention.”

Part of the issue is the word “addiction.” This word has extremely negative connotations, and most clinical definitions characterize addiction as something harmful and compulsive. There is nothing harmful about using a vibrator. While it is possible for a person to become obsessed with any object or behavior, there is nothing about vibrators in particular that evokes this kind of attachment, just as there was nothing in particular about Beanie Babies that made people collect them like mad!

It may be useful to view vibrator usage as a sexual preference. Humans are quick to fall into sexual patterns; in fact, our bodies grow nerve pathways in response to stimulation. You can become accustomed to the type of stimulation that a vibrator provides, or how quickly it gets you off. You can fall into a routine with your vibrator just as you can fall into a routine with partnered sex (the same foreplay, the same positions, etc). Your body will come to expect certain triggers in order to orgasm, but these triggers can always be re-established by switching up your sexual patterns and finding new ways to experience pleasure.

If you were orgasmic in other ways before trying a vibrator, you will retain that capability after using one. If you have only had orgasms with a vibrator, that’s okay too — it may be that your body requires a certain type of stimulation. Some women simply need strong stimulation for an extended period of time in order to orgasm, and hands and mouths often cannot provide that. Otherwise, you can always experiment with other sexual play that feels good to you; over time, your body will adapt and orgasm may follow.

If you are concerned about becoming accustomed to one type of stimulation, try switching to manual stimulation every once in a while, or buy a new sex toy that offers a unique sensation, like the Sqweel or Eroscillator. If you feel like you’re relying on your vibrator more than you’d like, retire it for a period of time and test some new techniques.

Some women worry that the vibrations from a sex toy could numb or desensitize them over time or permanently. This is untrue. Vibrator use will not damage your tissue or nerves. An extended session with a very powerful toy (like the popular Hitachi Magic Wand) can cause temporary numbness or desensitivity, but this sensation will dissipate after a short rest period. Numbness can also occur if you tend to push down on your genitals with your vibrator. This sort of numbness is akin to your hand or foot falling asleep — which happens when nerve endings become fatigued — and it is harmless. The blood will return to your genitals and all will be well again.

If you find yourself going numb while using a vibrator, try moving the toy around and varying the amount of pressure you use. Or place a towel between yourself and the toy to dull the vibrations. You can also wean yourself off of a very powerful toy by practicing with slightly weaker ones.

Will vibrator usage harm your partnered sex life? Far from it! In fact, at least one study has shown that people who use vibrators report fewer problems with sexual function. Using a vibrator can help you understand your body, which can improve the sex you have with others. Vibrators can also be a great complement to partnered sex. They can be especially helpful to the many women who have difficulty achieving orgasm during intercourse. Tristan Taormino’s Expert Guide to Female Orgasms has some great suggestions for incorporating vibrators into partnered sex.

In short, vibrators are not at all harmful, neither physically nor emotionally, and they will not stop you from having the wonderful sex you want to have.

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